Last edited by Faek
Tuesday, November 17, 2020 | History

2 edition of Biological effects of initial-nuclear radiation based on the Japanese data found in the catalog.

Biological effects of initial-nuclear radiation based on the Japanese data

Donald L. Summers

Biological effects of initial-nuclear radiation based on the Japanese data

  • 173 Want to read
  • 38 Currently reading

Published by Defense Nuclear Agency in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Radiation -- Physiological effect.,
  • Radiation -- Toxicology.,
  • Atomic bomb -- Japan -- Physiological effect.,
  • Nuclear warfare.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementDonald L. Summers, William J. Slosarik.
    ContributionsSlosarik, William J., United States. Defense Nuclear Agency., Dikewood Corporation (Albuquerque, N.M.)
    The Physical Object
    Pagination216 p. in various pagings :
    Number of Pages216
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14213893M

      5G is the next generation of cell phone infrastructure, yet it is categorically different than its predecessors (4G/LTE, 3G, 2G, etc.). It is not a simple upgrade. It is a major increase - and change - in the type of wireless radiation to which we will all be . Back in I wrote a book titled Body Snatchers in the Desert. There was a sequel from me in The Roswell UFO Conspiracy. Both books focused on the failure of a number of top secret balloon-based experiments in the summer of – and all in New Mexico. Some of those balloons were huge and based on Japanese plans.


Share this book
You might also like
Diflubenzuron hazards to fish, wildlife, and invertebrates

Diflubenzuron hazards to fish, wildlife, and invertebrates

Light Metals 2006

Light Metals 2006

A Picture Tour of the Smithsonian

A Picture Tour of the Smithsonian

Traditional soil and water conservation on the Dogon Plateau, Mali

Traditional soil and water conservation on the Dogon Plateau, Mali

Faith and freedom in Galatia

Faith and freedom in Galatia

War in heaven

War in heaven

GNU Emacs manual

GNU Emacs manual

Team Building

Team Building

Britain united

Britain united

Reconnaissance geochemical assessment of the Meadow Valley Mountains, Bureau of Land Management Wilderness Study Area (NV-050-156), Lincoln and Clark Counties, Nevada

Reconnaissance geochemical assessment of the Meadow Valley Mountains, Bureau of Land Management Wilderness Study Area (NV-050-156), Lincoln and Clark Counties, Nevada

Spectator

Spectator

Sing No Sad Songs

Sing No Sad Songs

Doggone dog joke book

Doggone dog joke book

Ivan Konstantinovich Aivazovsky

Ivan Konstantinovich Aivazovsky

Soil variability on steep, skeletal forested slopes of the Umpqua National Forest, Oregon

Soil variability on steep, skeletal forested slopes of the Umpqua National Forest, Oregon

Biological effects of initial-nuclear radiation based on the Japanese data by Donald L. Summers Download PDF EPUB FB2

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Summers, Donald L. Biological effects of initial-nuclear radiation based on the Japanese data. Washington, D.C.: Defense Nuclear Agency, the various effects does not remain the nuclear radiation in the early fallout in-same.

The initial nuclear radiation, for creases. For an underground burst at a example, is much more significant in moderate depth, the injuries from blast comparison with blast and thermal radi- and from thermal and initial nuclear.

Doses of radiation have been estimated based on models and measurements for different representative groups of individuals of the Japanese population.

The assessment of the doses included both external and internal (through inhalation of the radioactive plume and ingestion of radioactivity in food) exposure pathways.

Four things can happen when radiation enters a cell: 1. The radiation may pass through without any damage occurring; 2. The radiation may damage the cell, but the cell repairs the damage; 3. The radiation may damage the cell the damage is not repaired and the cell replicates itself in the damaged form; 4.

The cell dies. In medical applications, the radiation absorbed dose (rad) is more often used (1 rad = Gy; 1 rad results in the absorption of J/kg of tissue).

The SI unit measuring tissue damage caused by radiation is the sievert (Sv). This takes into account both the energy and the biological effects of the type of radiation involved in the Author: OpenStax. The Lancet Special Articles PHYSICAL AND BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF ATOMIC EXPLOSIONS FROM A CORRESPONDENT THE most comprehensive and authoritative account of atomic bomb explosions so far released to the public has lately been published in a book, The Effects of Atomic TfeojMs, compiled for the United States Atomic Energy Commission and Department of Defense by.

effects of a combination of protective agents with acute radiation exposure f Al2] because this subject is of only minor importance in estimation or modification of risk. There is a great scarcity of systematic data on which an analysis of combined effects can be based, in a variety of ways, such as by chemical, biological and Biological effects of initial-nuclear radiation based on the Japanese data book agents or by ionising radiation.

The effects of the damage from ionising radiation can be short-term or long-term depending on the means and severity of the exposure. The most important long-term effect of radiation exposure is an increased chance of getting cancer.

The most important risk from exposure to radiation is cancer. Much of our knowledge about the risks from radiation is based on studies of more thansurvivors of the atomic bombs at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, at the end of World War II.

Other studies of radiation industry workers and studies of people receiving large doses of. Radiation is energy in the form of waves of particles. There are two forms of radiation – non-ionizing and ionizing – which will be discussed in sections andrespectively.

Non-ionizing radiation. Non-ionizing radiation has less energy than ionizing radiation; it does not possess enough energy to.). Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation: a Perspective for Japan T.

Luckey Figure 1. A Spectrum of the Effects of Ionizing Radiation. The complete dose-response curve for ionizing radiation includes radiation deficiency, radiation optimum, and radiation toxicity (modified from LuckeyFigure.

evidence of radiation-induced health effects in exposed groups and advances in the understanding of the biological mechanisms by which radiation-induced effects on human health or on non-human biota can occur.

Those assessments provide the scientific foundation used, inter alia, by the relevant agencies of the United Nations. Get this from a library. The effects of nuclear weapons. [Samuel Glasstone; Philip J Dolan; United States.

Department of Defense.; United States. Department of Energy.; United States. Defense Atomic Support Agency.;] -- "When 'The Effects of Atomic Weapons' was published inthe explosive energy yields of the fission bombs available at that time were equivalent to some thousands of tons.

Effects of Atomic Radiation: A Half-Century of Studies from Hiroshima and Nagasaki is first and foremost a scientific work, summarizing the core findings of the definitive study on radiation exposure; while throughout the book, the author provides personal accounts that illustrate the human dimensions of the s: 1.

The effects of low-dose radiation are being increasingly investigated in biological, epidemiological, and clinical studies. Many recent studies have indicated the beneficial effects of low doses of radiation, whereas some studies have suggested harmful effects even at low doses.

This review article introduces various studies reporting both the beneficial and harmful effects of low-dose. An international working group of scientists, researchers and public health policy professionals (The BioInitiative Working Group) has released its report on electromagnetic fields (EMF) and health.

They document serious scientific concerns about current limits regulating how much EMF is allowable from power lines, cell phones, and many other sources of EMF exposure in daily life.

RSSC BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF IONIZING RADIATION 08/11 V. PATTERN OF BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS In general, the sequence of events following radiation exposure may be classified as follows: A.

Prodromal Stage Symptoms which appear quickly after radiation exposure are referred to as prodromal radiation syndrome. This has led radiation biologists and health physicists to define the effective (or biological) dose, measured in Sieverts (Sv), as the low-LET dose required to induce the same health effect as observed for a higher LET radiation [1, 9].

Therefore, one Sv corresponds to one gray (Gy) or Joule/kg (J/kg). These documents reveal key results related to radiation's effects on pregnancy termination, sex ratio, congenital defects, and early mortality of children. Edited by two of the principal architects of the studies, J.

Neel and W. Schull, the volume also offers an important comparison with studies of the genetic effects of radiation on mice. The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in Japan was classified as a level-7 international nuclear event.

The disaster disrupted lives and livelihoods; yet, it is but one of many predicted to occur based on the frequency of past nuclear failures. [i] [ii] However, despite its fundamental riskiness, nuclear energy remains tied to national security and.

By allowing scientists to study their suffering, atomic bomb survivors have transformed our understanding of radiation's health effects. Kunihiko Iida wants the world to know that the atomic bombs the United States dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki 75 years ago next month are still claiming lives and causing suffering.

Iida was 3 years old in August A computational model was used in studies of the biological effects of blast from nuclear explosions. The translational effects of blast waves for objects as small as a mg stone and as large as a lb man were computed from theoretical studies and results were compared to field data for near-ideal blast waves from nuclear explosions.

The health effects of nuclear explosions are due primarily to air blast, thermal radiation, initial nuclear radiation, and residual nuclear radiation or fallout.

Blast. Nuclear explosions produce air-blast effects similar to those produced by conventional explosives. radiation for lung cancer in females (National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP), ). Human studies also provide evidence for a declining risk with increasing age at exposure, although the magnitude of this reduction above age 30 years is uncertain (NCRP, ; Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR), ).

incidence and mortality based on these data are assumed to be scalable to other populations, dose-rates, and radiation types (Cucinotta et al.

However, because there is a lack of human data for protons and HZE ions, current space risk estimates must rely entirely on experimental model systems and biophysical considerations.

Radiation Protection J. Burnham Chapter3: Biological Effects page 3 • BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF IONIZING RADIATION INTRODUCTION This chapter deals with the effects ofionizing radiation on the body.

Itdescribes the possible and probable short-termand long-termeffects produced by ionizing radiation depositing energy. Radiology, Radiation Oncology and Biological Effects of Radiation IFMBE proceedings are indexed by by SCOPUS, EI Compendex, Japanese Science and Technology Agency (JST), SCImago.

Proposals can be submitted by contacting the Springer responsible editor shown on the series webpage (see “Contacts”), or by getting in touch with the series. The potential health effects of transmissions in 30 and GHz new frequencies need to be carefully understood for use in consumer devices. NYU WIRELESS has been leading research in understanding interactions between the human body and millimeter-wave radiation.

The lifetime cancer mortality risk from radiation, based on epidemiological data from survivors of the Japanese atomic bombs, is estimated to be per sievert (ICRP ). However, direct characterization of ri sk at lower doses is at or beyond the limits of epidemiology. Cancer risks from exposure to ionizing radiation clearly increase at doses.

Health effects of Japan's radiation crisis Battered by an earthquake and a tsunami, Japan now faces a third monumental problem: the release of radiation from crippled nuclear power plants.

How that radiation will affect the health of the Japanese people — and the health of others around the globe — is a developing story. Much of the destruction caused by a nuclear explosion is due to blast effects. Most buildings, except reinforced or blast-resistant structures, will suffer moderate damage when subjected to overpressures of only kilopascals (kPa) ( pounds-force per square inch or atm).

Data obtained from the Japanese surveys found that 8 psi (55 kPa) was sufficient to destroy all wooden and brick. EVAN DOUPLE, Radiation Effects Research Foundation: The Manhattan Project focused so much on physics, and really didn't know very much about the biological effects and health effects in particular.

Radiation dose equivalent as a biologically effective energy deposition per gram is usually expressed in rems, with natural background giving approximately rem/y in the United States.

Exposure limits are set by use of data on radiation effects at high dosages with a conservative linear hypothesis applied to predict effects at low dose rates. BACKGROUND: The Department of Energy, Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety funds studies of the Japanese atomic bomb survivors at the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan.

The RERF program is believed to have the longest history of any ongoing international research program. The sievert (symbol: Sv) is a derived unit of ionizing radiation dose in the International System of Units (SI) and is a measure of the health effect of low levels of ionizing radiation on the human body.

The sievert is important in dosimetry and radiation protection, and is named after Rolf Maximilian Sievert, a Swedish medical physicist renowned for work on radiation dose measurement and. Dose to Marine Biota. We used radioactivity concentration data measured in marine organisms and in surrounding waters (1, 2) to reconstruct the absorbed dose and absorbed dose rate received by marine organisms after the Fukushima ved Cs concentrations in Japanese coastal waters increased from a background of about 1 Bq⋅m −3 to peak at values of.

While the effects of high and acute doses of ionising radiation are easily observed and understood in humans (e.g. Japanese atomic bomb survivors), the effects of low-level radiation are very difficult to observe and highly is because the baseline cancer rate is already very high and the risk of developing cancer fluctuates 40% because of individual life style and.

The Effects of Nuclear Weapons - Glasstone and Dolan Authoritative Military Reference on Atomic Explosions, Blast Damage, Radiation, Fallout, EMP, Biological, Radio and Radar Effects - Kindle edition by Glasstone, Samuel, Philip Dolan, Department of Defense, Energy Research and Development Administration, U.S.

Military. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or s: 3. Stanford Libraries' official online search tool for books, media, journals, databases, government documents and more. The effects of nuclear weapons. Nuclear weapons are fundamentally different from conventional weapons because of the vast amounts of explosive energy they can release and the kinds of effects they produce, such as high temperatures and radiation.

The prompt effects of a nuclear explosion and fallout are well known through data gathered from the attacks on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan; from. The level of radiation decreases dramatically as distance from the site increases. Radiation levels in Tokyo, about kilometers to the southwest, have been reported to.

Within 6 weeks of the bombings, three U.S. and two Japanese expert teams were at work in both cities to study the biological impact of the radiation. Their objectives differed.These include entities with interest in the biological effects of non-ionizing radiation.

The data presented and discussions included in this manuscript represent the collective judgment of COMAR who contribute their time voluntarily. No drafts of this manuscript were reviewed by or influenced by any of the aforementioned entities.